5 Things You Don’t Do At A Sneaker Store/Boutique

Almost everywhere you go, there’s a code of conduct that needs to be followed. Sometimes it’s written out (like no shirt, no shoes, no service at a¬†convenience store) and sometimes it’s unwritten (not using a urinal next to someone else if there’s another one open in the men’s bathroom).

Although there isn’t a written list of things that you shouldn’t do at any sneaker store or boutique, there’s an unwritten and somewhat unknown list of things that should be avoided. Why should you avoid these things, you might ask? If you don’t you’ll be “that guy”…and nobody wants to be “that guy”.

Without any further ado, here’s 5 things you don’t do at a sneaker store or boutique

1. Don’t ask “Are there any more colors in the back?”

Although it might not¬†initially seem like it, asking if there are any more colors/styles in the back is an absolutely moronic question. For example: “Do you guys have these in red in the back? I see the black, grey and green out here, but there’s no red”. Just think about it. A retail business needs to sell the product they have in store to get new product and to stay afloat. Why would there be anything that wasn’t on display? This isn’t a cigar store where you say the secret phrase to get at the selection of Cuban cigars. There’s no secret stash of kicks and gear chilling in the back…and there never will be either.

2. Don’t Ask To Order A Random Pair Of Jordans

Did a pair of J’s that you’re interested in come out this past weekend, and a few days later you decided to stop in the store to see if they could be ordered? That’s fine. However, what’s not at all fine is asking to order a random pair of shoes, i.e. “Ay fam (ties into #5), can ya’ll order those white Mikes with that black shiny leather on the toe and those clear soles? I think they’re called the Concord Bugs Bunny Space Jams”. No. Businesses make their orders almost a year in advance, and when a shoe has already been released they can’t just order more whenever they feel like it. Take that to Ebay.

3. Don’t Try To Get The Plug

There’s arguably nothing more annoying in the sneaker business than being asked for the plug, be it on shoes, accessories, or gear. Here’s some examples: “Can ya’ll help me get some of them new Mikes? Them is wet”. “Man…what’s up with that discount?” ” Help your boy out yo” “Man I drove up from Chicago/Milwaukee/Asgard. You gotta help me out”. You don’t choose the plug, the plug chooses you. If and when it’s time for you to get plugged, it’ll be offered to you. You don’t need to ask for it. People who work at shoe stores/ boutiques get bothered about the plug ever day, from people they know well to their sister’s friend’s cousin who they had social studies with in seventh grade and didn’t even like that much. Don’t ask for the plug.

4. Don’t Ask For Supreme Gear

If you step into any shop and ask for Supreme gear, you need to do some research, both personal and professional. With the exception of some consignment shops like Scotty Piff, you can’t find Supreme anywhere but Supreme. That’s how they’ve managed to remain cool this long: because they’re exclusive. If every shop on God’s green earth had them, nobody would want them. And if you’re looking to buy some gear from them, please do some research. You’ve gotta know the history of the gear you’re rocking.

5. Don’t Precede Anything You Say With “Ay Fam”.

Similar to “don’t bro me if you don’t know me”. Referring to someone you don’t know anything about as “fam” is not only annoying, it’s usually a preface to another question on this list, from “is there anything else in the back” to “can ya’ll order them mikes from like 3 years back for me”? Just don’t do it.

That’s a wrap for the 5 things that you shouldn’t do at any sneaker store or boutique. As there are several more that could possibly be touched on, a follow up to this piece might be in order sometime soon. Any additions to the list, or things that we missed? Let us know in the comments.


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